Panel Discussion: Radical Solidarity

Thursday, October 1st 2020, 11am

With Alana Lentin (Western Sydney University) and Anaheed Al-Hardan (American University of Beirut)

Chair: Inna Michaeli and Nahed Samour (Humboldt-University Berlin)

Following our two-part workshop on Jewish–Muslim relations and solidarity (www.xartsplitta.net/en/radical-solidarity/) we will be holding a panel discussion with Alana Lentin and Anaheed Al-Hardan. The panel discussion will open with two respective short inputs by Alana Lentin and Anaheed Al-Hardan. Alana Lentin will be giving a talk on her newest publication Why Race Still Matters (Polity, 2020), here a focus will be laid on the 4th chapter of the book: „Good Jew/Bad Jew“.

Anaheed Al-Hardan will be speaking on the topic: “Anti-colonial and radical solidarity in the context of south-south alliances”.

Besides dealing with questions regarding both inputs, the aim of the panel is to discuss topics that came up during the workshop with references to a broader, transnational perspective.

The event will take place online and in spoken English. Please register via: contact@xartsplitta.net and include 2-3 lines regarding the motivation for your participation, in order to receive the access information. Please also be informed that, due to technical restraints, we can only admit a restricted number of participants.


Dr Alana Lentin is Associate Professor in Cultural and Social Analysis at Western Sydney University. She is a Jewish woman who is a settler on Gadigal land (Sydney, Australia). She works on the critical theorization of race, racism and antiracism. In 2017, she was the Hans Speier Visiting Professor of Sociology at the New School for Social Research in New York. She is co-editor of the Rowman and Littlefield International book series, Challenging Migration Studies and former President of the Australian Critical Race & Whiteness Studies Association (2017-20). Her books include Why Race Still Matters (Polity 2020), The Crises of Multiculturalism: Racism in a neoliberal age (with Gavan Titley 2011), Racism and Sociology (2014 with Wulf D. Hund), Racism (2008) and racism and Anti-racism in Europe (2004).

She has written for The Guardian, OpenDemocracy, ABC Religion and Ethics, The Conversation, and Public Seminar.

Her personal website is www.alanalentin.net

 

Dr. Anaheed Al-Hardan is an assistant professor of sociology in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Media Studies at the American University of Beirut. Her research is concerned with coloniality and resistance in relation to counter-memory, decolonial knowledges and south-south thought in the Arab World, and has appeared in Journal of Palestine Studies, Qualitative Inquiry, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, Journal of Holy Land and Palestine Studies and International Sociology. She is the author of the award-winning Palestinians in Syria: Nakba Memories of Shattered Communities (Columbia University Press, 2016), joint winner of the 2016 Academic Book Award at the London Palestine Book Awards. Her current book project examines Arab decolonial theory within the context of south-south philosophies of liberation and decolonization.​ She is a Principal Investigator on the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded research program Afro-Asian Futures Past​.

Previously, Anaheed Al-Hardan was the Arcapita Visiting Professor of Arab Studies at the Middle Institute at ​Columbia University (2018), Visiting Scholar at the Bandung Humanism Initiative at the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University (2018), Visiting Fellow at the Berlin Graduate School for the Study of Muslim Cultures and Society at the Free University of Berlin (2017), Research Fellow at the ICI Berlin Institute for Cultural Inquiry (2011-14) and a Doctoral Fellow of the Palestinian American Research Center (2008).

 

Dr. Inna Michaeli is a sociologist and feminist activist. Her PhD from the Humboldt University of Berlin focused on the field of “Women’s Economic Empowerment” and explored the intersections of economic citizenship, gender and ethnicity in neoliberalism. For the past 20 years she takes part in feminist, LGBT*QI and anti-colonial struggles, political education, and organizing by and for migrant women.

 

Dr. Nahed Samour studied law and Islamic studies at the universities of Bonn, Birzeit/Ramallah, London (SOAS), Berlin (HU), Harvard and Damascus. She was a doctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History in Frankfurt/Main. She clerked at the Court of Appeals in Berlin, and held a Post Doc position at the Eric Castrén Institute of International Law and Human Rights, Helsinki University, Finland and was Early Career Fellow at the Lichtenberg-Kolleg, Göttingen Institute for Advance Study. She is Junior Faculty at the Harvard Law School, Institute of Global Law and Policy.